Friday, May 15, 2020

The Greater Antillean Terrestrial Flora and Fauna, part I: the Oligocene

When trying to get an idea of the ancient flora and fauna of the Greater Antilles one of the best records comes from the early Oligocene (between 33-27 million years ago) of Puerto Rico. Now don't get me wrong, there is still much to discover and describe, but here I'll summarize current knowledge, up to the most recent publications mixed in with some extra stuff stemming from fieldwork in recent years.
At present, what we know largely derives from fossils collected from two sedimentary deposits, the Juana Diaz Formation and the San Sebastian Formation, found in southern and northern Puerto Rico, respectively. Both deposits represent a range of shallow marine, coastal and riverine deposits which makes them ideal for the preservation of a variety of species ranging across different environments. Since the beginning of last century various works have documented the marine fauna of these formations, from bivalves and gastropods (Hubbard, 1920; Maury, 1920), echinoderms (Jackson, 1922; Gordon, 1963; Velez-Juarbe and Santos, 2008; Donovan et al., 2019), crustaceans (Gordon, 1966; Schweitzer et al., 2006, 2008) and others. Marine vertebrates are present, although scarce, but there are at least three species of dugongids known from these early Oligocene deposits in Puerto Rico, namely "Halitherium" antillense Matthew, 1916, Caribosiren turneri, Reinhart, 1959, and Priscosiren atlantica Velez-Juarbe y Domning, 2014. There is also an interesting fish and elasmobranch fauna that is still largely undescribed. It is within these formations, that we find some of the best evidence for terrestrial plants, semiaquatic (i.e. turtles and crocodylians) and terrestrial vertebrates to whom we dedicate this brief review.
Representative stratigraphic section of the San Sebastian Formation, showing the location of isotopically-dated units (numbers in bold), and the distribution and occurrence of some of the fossils discussed here. (Modified from Marivaux et al., 2020).
Flora
Some of the earliest Oligocene fossils described from Puerto Rico consisted of a collection of plant remains from the San Sebastian Formation, including leaves, seeds and wood, described by Arthur Hollick (1928) and representing a total of 88 species. This work was followed many years later by the description of the palynoflora by Graham and Jarzen (1969) who reported 40 species, and more recently the description of a fossil seed by Herrera et al. (2014) also from the San Sebastian Fm. Seven species are both represented by leaves/seeds and pollen, so in total these works document a total of 122 plants that were present in Puerto Rico by the early Oligocene (Graham, 1996). Amongst the plants present there are some which are still known to occur naturally in Puerto Rico like Zamia, but others, like Sacoglottis tertiaria, represent a genus that is absent from the Antilles, although it is present in other parts of the Neotropics. This ancient flora also documents the presence of Eugenia which nowadays includes various species of trees and shrubs found in Puerto Rico, including some endemics like Eugenia borinquensis (guayabota de sierra) which is known from the highest elevations in the island. In sum, this collection of fossil plants represents an interesting combination, as it includes taxa that range across a variety of zones (temperate, to warm temperate to mangrove communities) giving us a profile of the flora present in the island from the mountains down to the coast (Graham and Jarzen, 1969; Graham, 1996).
Examples of fossil plants from the San Sebastian Formation. Top, part of a tree trunk; bottom, a pair of fossil leaves.
Amphibians
At present there is only one record of amphibians from the Oligocene of Puerto Rico, discovered in the San Sebastian Fm. This was published recently (Blackburn et al., 2020) and not only represents the oldest fossil amphibian from the Antilles, but is also the oldest record in the world of a frog of the genus Eleutherodactylus or coquí as they are commonly called in Puerto Rico and elsewhere. You can read more about this discovery here and here.
Life reconstruction of the fossil coquí from San Sebastian (aka coquí abuelo).
Turtles
One of the group of terrestrial/semiaquatic vertebrates that is found quite frequently in these deposits are turtles. However, so far there is only one publication describing material from the San Sebastian Fm. which belongs to a pelomedusoid or side-necked turtle, a group whose extant species are restricted to freshwater habitats (I wrote about it here; Wood, 1972). Fossils of side-necked turtles are also known from many other Oligocene through Miocene formation in Puerto Rico, including the Juana Diaz Formation. Usually these consist of shell fragments or limb bones, most which have yet to be described in detail. The one exception is a skull from the Cibao Formation (~16-12 million years; Ortega-Ariza et al., 2015) which was dubbed Bairdemys hartsteini Gaffney and Wood, 2002. The skull is well preserved, and represents a genus of turtles that has been since documented to occur in other parts of the Caribbean (Gaffney and Wood, 2002; Gaffney et al., 2008; Ferreira et al., 2015, 2018). So far it seems that pelomedusoids were the dominant group of turtles in the Paleogene and Neogene of the Antilles as no other groups seem to be present. Interestingly, Bairdemys seems to represent an adaptation of pelomedusoids to life in the ocean, differing from their extant relatives, and may have been ecological equivalents to some of the marine turtles that nowadays live in the region (Ferreira et al., 2015).
Fragmentary remains of a side-necked turtle from the San Sebastian Formation, prior to preparation for further study.
Crocodiles
Crocodiles have been around the Greater Antilles at least since the Eocene (here's an early post on that subject). From the Oligocene the only described species is the gharial Aktiogavialis puertoricensis Velez-Juarbe et al., 2007, from the San Sebastian Fm. The specimen we described consist only of the back end of the skull, but since its discovery, my colleagues and I have collected additional material, including bits of two other skulls and an associated partial skeleton. Part of this material is still getting prepared for subsequent description and publication. A second species of Aktiogavialis was described recently from late Miocene deposits in Venezuela (Salas-Gismondi et al., 2019). This suggest that Aktiogavialis represents a dispersal event from the Greater Antilles into South America.
Additional crocodylian remains are known from the Juana Diaz Formation which seem to seem to represent a different species and not a gharial, but we still need to find more material to be sure. In addition to these Oligocene fossils, in early-middle Miocene deposits in Cuba and Puerto Rico there are remains that seem to represent a group of endemic crocodylians (Brochu et al., 2007; Brochu y Jiménez-Vázquez, 2014). The material is fragmentary, but nevertheless very interesting as endemic groups of crocodylians have been described for other groups of islands around the world, and these from Cuba and Puerto Rico may represent the first example from the Americas.
Top left, dorsal view of the skull of Aktiogavialis puertoricensis next to a line drawing of the skull of an Indian gharial for comparison.
Terrestrial Mammals
Finding fossils of pre-Pleistocene terrestrial mammals is a major challenge in the Greater Antilles as most of the fossiliferous deposits are marine. As such, we must concentrate our efforts in deposits such as those represented in the Juana Diaz and San Sebastian formations. It is still challenging, but we have better chances in those than in the limestone deposits.

Sloths
The first evidence of Oligocene terrestrial mammals to be documented from the Greater Antilles consisted of the proximal end of a sloth femur (leg bone) discovered in the Juana Diaz Formation and described by Ross MacPhee and Manuel Iturralde-Vinent (1995). This discovery was, in part, what inspired these researchers to look deeply into the geology and paleogeography of the region and its role into the origins of the Greater Antillean land mammal fauna. The discovery of this Juana Diaz sloth suggested that the endemic sloths that inhabited the Greater Antilles until relatively recent times represent an old lineage that colonized the region around 33 million years ago. This eventually led to the proposal of the GAARlandia hypothesis as a potential pathway for colonization of the Greater Antilles by organisms from South America, a subject previously discussed here.
Even though some experts suggest that the affinities of the Juana Diaz sloth need to be carefully revised (Pujos et al., 2017), it has been shown through molecular analyses that Caribbean sloths did indeed arrive to the region a long time ago, and that they represent an endemic group known as Megalocnoidea (Delsuc et al., 2019; Presslee et al., 2019).
Phylogenetic relationships amongst sloths showing the basal position and divergence time of Caribbean sloths (Megalocnoidea). (From Delsuc et al., 2019:fig. 3.)
Rodents
At least two species of caviomorph rodents were present in Puerto Rico during the early Oligocene (Velez-Juarbe et al., 2014; Marivaux et al., 2020). Both species are part of the family Dinomyidae and include Borikenomys praecursor Marivaux et al., 2020, and a second, larger, yet to be named species. As with the sloths and coquí frogs, the discovery of these rodents imply that this particular group colonized the region during the late Eocene-early Oligocene (~33 million years ago) as these are related to species that lived up until about the early occupation of the island by humans. You can read more about their discovery here and here.
Los dientes de Borikenomys praecursor (izquierda) y del otro roedor fósil (derecha) de la Formación San Sebastian.
As you can see, most of what we know of the terrestrial flora and fauna of the Greater Antilles during the Oligocene stems from discoveries in a couple of formations in Puerto Rico, and show some interesting distinctions to what we find today in the region. Of course, like I said earlier there is still much to discover and describe as we learn more about the flora and fauna of the Caribbean between 33-27 million years ago. So this is it, for now, but stay tuned for news of more discoveries in the upcoming months/years.

Recommended Literature

Blackburn, D. C., R. M. Keeffe, M. C. Vallejo-Pareja, and J. Velez-Juarbe. 2020. The earliest record of Caribbean frogs: a fossil coquí from Puerto Rico. Biology Letters 16:20190947.

Brochu, C. A., and O. Jiménez-Vázquez. 2014. Enigmatic crocodyliforms from the early Miocene of Cuba. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:1094–1101.

Brochu, C. A., A. Nieves-Rivera, J. Vélez-Juarbe, J. D. Daza-Vaca, and H. Santos. 2007. Tertiary crocodylians from Puerto Rico: evidence for late Tertiary endemic crocodylians in the West Indies? Geobios 40:51–59.

Delsuc, F., M. Kuch, G. C. Gibb, E. Karpinski, D. Hackenberger, P. Szpak, J. G. Martínez, J. I. Mead, H. G. McDonald, R. D. E. MacPhee, G. Billet, L. Hautier, and H. N. Poinar. 2019. Ancient mitogenomes reveal the evolutionary history and biogeography of sloths. Current Biology 29:2031–2042.

Donovan, S. K., S. N. Nielsen, J. Velez-Juarbe, and R. W. Portell. 2019. The isicronine crinoid Isselicrinus Rovereto from the Paleogene of the Americas. Swiss Journal of Palaeontology 138:317–324.

Ferreira, G. S., M. Bronzati, M. C. Langer, and J. Sterli. 2018. Phylogeny, biogeography and diversification patterns of side-necked turtles (Testudines: Pleurodira). Royal Society Open Science 5:171773.

Ferreira, G. S., A. D. Rincón, A. Solórzano, and M. C. Langer. 2015. The last marine pelomedusoids (Testudines: Pleurodira): a new species of Bairdemys and the paleoecology of Stereogenyina. PeerJ 3:e1063.

Gaffney, E. S., and R. C. Wood. 2002. Bairdemys, a new side-necked turtle (Pelomedusoides: Podocnemididae) from the Miocene of the Caribbean. American Museum Novitates 3359:1–28.

Gaffney, E. S., T. M. Scheyer, K. G. Johnson, J. Bocquentin, and O. A. Aguilera. 2008. Two new species of the side necked turtle genus, Bairdemys (Pleurodira, Podocnemididae), from the Miocene of Venezuela. Paläontologische Zeitschrift 82:209–229.

Gordon, W. A. 1963. Middle Tertiary echinoids of Puerto Rico. Journal of Paleontology 37(3):628–642.

Gordon, W. A. 1966. Two crab species from the middle Tertiary of Puerto Rico. Transactions of the Third Caribbean Geological Conference, Kingston, Jamaica, 2nd-11th April, 1962:184–186.

Graham, A. 1996. Paleobotany of Puerto Rico - from Arthur Hollick's (1928) scientific survey paper to the present. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 776:103–114.

Graham, A., and D. M. Jarzen. 1969. Studies in neotropical botany. I. The Oligocene communities of Puerto Rico. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 56:308–357.

Herrera, F., S. R. Manchester, J. Velez-Juarbe, and C. Jaramillo. 2014. Phytogeographic history of the Humiriaceae (Part 2).  International Journal of Plant Sciences 175:828–840.

Hollick, A. 1928. Paleobotany of Porto Rico. New York Academy of Sciences, Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands 7(3):177–393.

Hubbard, B. 1920. Tertiary Mollusca from the Lares district, Porto Rico. New York Academy of Sciences, Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands 3(2):79–164.

Jackson, R. T. 1922. Fossil echini of the West Indies. Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 306:1–103.

MacPhee, R. D. E., and M. A. Iturralde-Vinent. 1995. Origin of the Greater Antillean land mammal fauna, 1: new Tertiary fossils from Cuba and Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 3141:1–30.

Marivaux, L., J. Velez-Juarbe, G. Merzeraud, F. Pujos, L. W. Viñola Lopez, M. Boivin, H. Santos-Mercado, E. J. Cruz, A. Grajales, J. Padilla, K. I. Velez-Rosado, M. Philippon, J.-L. Léticée, P. Münch, and P.-O. Antoine. 2020. Early Oligocene chinchilloid caviomorphs from Puerto Rico and the initial colonization of the West Indies. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 287:2019806.

Matthew, W. D. 1916. New sirenian from the Tertiary of Porto Rico. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 27:23–29.

Maury, C. J. 1920. Tertiary Mollusca from Porto Rico and their zonal relations. New York Academy of Sciences, Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands 3(1):1–77.

Ortega-Ariza, D., E. K. Franseen, H. Santos-Mercado, W. R. Ramírez-Martínez, E. E. Core-Suárez. 2015. Strontium isotope stratigraphy for Oligocene-Miocene carbonate systems in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic: Implications for Caribbean processes affecting depositional history. Journal of Geology 123:539–560.

Presslee, S., G. J. Slater, F. Pujos, A. M. Forasiepi, R. Fischer, K. Molloy, M. Mackie, J. L. Lanata, J. Southon, R. Feranec, J. Bloch, A. Hajduk, F. M. Martin, R. Salas Gismondi, M. Reguero, C. de Muizon, A. Greenwood, B. T. Chait, K. Penkman, M. Collins, and R. D. E. MacPhee. 2019. Paleoproteomics resolve sloth relationships. Nature Ecology and Evolution 3:1121–1130.

Pujos, F., G. De Iuliis, and C. Cartelle. 2017. A paleogeographic overview of tropical fossil sloths: towards an understanding of the origin of extant suspensory sloths? Journal of Mammalian Evolution 24:19–38.

Reinhart, R. H. 1959. A review of the Sirenia and Desmostylia. University of California Publications in Geological Sciences 36:1–146.

Salas-Gismondi, R., J. W. Moreno-Bernal, T. M Scheyer, M. R. Sánchez-Villagra, and C. Jaramillo. 2019. New Miocene Caribbean gavialoids and patterns of longirostry in crocodylians. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 17:1049–1075.

Schweitzer, C. E., M. A. Iturralde-Vinent, J. L. Hetler, and J. Velez-Juarbe. 2006. Oligocene and Miocene decapods (Thalassinidiea and Brachyura) from the Caribbean. Annals of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History 75(2):111–136.

Schweitzer, C. E., J. Velez-Juarbe, M. Martinez, A. Collmar Hull, R. M. Fledmann, and H. Santos. 2008. New Cretaceous and Cenozoic Decapoda (Crustacea: Thalassinidea, Brachyura) from Puerto Rico, United States Territory. Bulletin of the Mizunami Fossil Museum 34:1–15.

Velez-Juarbe, J., and D. P. Domning. 2014. Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region: X. Priscosiren atlantica, gen. et sp. nov. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:951–964.

Velez-Juarbe, J., and H. Santos. 2008. Fossil Echinodermata from Puerto Rico; pp. 369–395 in W. I. Ausich and G. D. Webster (eds.), Echinoderm Paleobiology. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana.

Velez-Juarbe, J., C. A. Brochu, and H. Santos. 2007. A gharial from the Oligocene of Puerto Rico: transoceanic dispersal in the history of a non-marine reptile. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 274:1245–1254.

Velez-Juarbe, J., T. Martin, R. D. E. MacPhee, and D. Ortega-Ariza. 2014. The earliest Caribbean rodents: Oligocene caviomorphs from Puerto Rico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:157–163.

Wood, R. C. 1972. A fossil pelomedusid turtle from Puerto Rico. Breviora 392:1–13.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

El coquí más antiguo de Puerto Rico y el mundo!

¿Alguna vez se han preguntado desde cuándo existen coquíes en Puerto Rico y en el Caribe? Pues hoy les tenemos la contestación a esa pregunta.

Y es que hoy (8 de abril de 2020) acaba de ser publicada mi más reciente colaboración científica junto a David Blackburn, Rachel Keeffe y Maria Camila Vallejo-Pareja del Museo de Historia Natural de Florida en la cual describimos un fósil que representa la rana más antigua de todo el Caribe. En este trabajo, el cual salió en la revista científica Biology Letters describimos en detalle un pequeño hueso que representa el registro más antiguo de una rana del género Eleutherodactylus, o coquí, como se les conoce comúnmente en Puerto Rico. El fósil fue descubierto en una localidad en el noroeste de Puerto Rico, en rocas que datan de entre 31-29 millones de años. Esta nueva localidad es muy cerca de donde descubrimos los roedores más antiguos del Caribe, trabajo que salió publicado en febrero de este año. Previo a este descubrimiento, el registro más antiguo de Eleutherodactylus en el Caribe era del Mioceno temprano (~20-15 Ma) de la República Dominicana.
Arriba: mapa de Puerto Rico donde se ve la distribución de depósitos del Oligoceno-Mioceno.
Centro: localidad paleontológica (izquierda), fósil de coquí (derecha), en distintos ángulos.
Abajo: ilustración interpretativa y escala de tamaño del coquí fósil de Puerto Rico.
El fósil consiste del extremo distal de un húmero (el hueso del brazo) el cual presenta características diagnósticas que nos permitieron identificarlo como una rana, y más específicamente como un miembro del género Eleutherodactylus. Este grupo de ranas que incluye muchas especies endémicas en el Caribe (sobre 240 especies) tienen su origen y parientes más cercanos en América del Sur. En general, esto es consistente con los orígenes sudamericanos de la mayoría de los vertebrados terrestres que habitan en las Antillas, aunque existen algunas excepciones. Una de esta excepciones es la presencia de salamandras (Palaeoplethodon hispaniolae) en el Mioceno de la República Dominicana, grupo que está completamente ausente en la región hoy día y cuyos orígenes son en Norteamérica.

Parte del proceso de identificación de nuestro fósil consistió en compararlo con otras especies de coquí y con otros anfibios que se encuentran en la región del Caribe. Entre las especies con las que hicimos comparación están: 11 de las 17 especies de coquí que hoy día habitan en Puerto Rico, otros sub-géneros de Eleutherodactylus, el sapo concho de PR (Peltophryne lemur), la rana verde de La Española (Boana heilprini), la rana platanera (Osteopilus septentrionalis) y la ranita de labio blanco (Leptodactylus albilabris). Todo con el fin de tener la mayor cantidad de información morfológica y estar seguros de nuestra identificación.
Comparación del coquí fósil de Puerto Rico con otras especies de Eleutherodactylus (arriba) y otros géneros relacionados. (Modificado de la Figura S1 de nuestro trabajo).
Comparación del coquí fósil de Puerto Rico con distintos sub-géneros de Eleutherodactylus, y otros anuros caribeños. (Modificado de la Figura 2 de nuestro trabajo).
Usando parte de la información morfológica que logramos obtener del fósil, también fue posible hacer un estimado de 36 mm (1.4 pulgadas) para el tamaño del cuerpo de esta especie (ver reconstrucción en la primera imagen).

Este descubrimiento se une a otros que nos muestran cómo era Puerto Rico entre 31-27 millones de años atrás, donde ya habitaban algunos grupos que todavía vemos comúnmente en la isla, pero con otros, como los gaviales, perezosos y roedores gigantes, que ya no existen. Finalmente, la edad del depósito donde se encontró el fósil en adición a estimados de divergencia molecular, sugiere que colonización inicial de Eleutherodactylus en el Caribe posiblemente se dio bajo las mismas condiciones que facilitaron la llegada de roedores y perezosos a la región, tema que discutí en esta entrada previa.
Un macho de coquí común (Eleutherodactylus coqui) cuidando su camada de huevos.
Este descubrimiento es el más reciente de varios que nos van ayudando a conocer mejor el origen de la fauna de vertebrados Antillanos. Al presente el registro consiste de tortugas pelomedúsidas, coquíes, perezosos terrestres y roedores caviomorfos. Pero como siempre, todavía queda más trabajo por hacer y descubrimientos que documentar y describir para continuar conociendo mejor como era nuestra isla en el pasado. Así que estén pendientes a este blog donde espero traerles más noticias en un futuro no tan distante.

Lecturas recomendadas

Blackburn, D. C., R. M. Keeffe, M. C. Vallejo-Pareja, and J. Velez-Juarbe. 2020. The earliest record of Caribbean frogs: a fossil coquí from Puerto Rico. Biology Letters 16:20190947.

Brace, S., J. A. Thomas, L. Dalén, J. Burger, R. D. E. MacPhee, I. Barnes, and S. T. Turvey. 2016. Evolutionary history of the Nesophontidae, the last unplaced recent mammal family. Molecular Biology and Evolution 33:3095–3103.

Delsuc, F., M. Kuch, G. C. Gibb, E. Karpinski, D. Hackenberger, P. Szpak, J. G. Martínez, J. I. Mead, H. G. McDonald, R. D. E. MacPhee, G. Billet, L. Hautier, and H. N. Poinar. 2019. Ancient mitogenomes reveal the evolutionary history and biogeography of sloths. Current Biology 29:2031–2042.

Graham, A., and D. M. Jarzen. 1969. Studies in neotropical botany. I. The Oligocene communities of Puerto Rico. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 56:308–357.

Hedges, S. B. 2006. Paleogeography of the Antilles and origin of the West Indian terrestrial vertebrates. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 93:231–244.

Hedges, S. B., R. Powell, R. W. Henderson, S. Hanson, and J. C. Murphy. 2019. Definition of the Caribbean islands biogeographic region, with checklist and recommendations for standardized common names of amphibians and reptiles. Caribbean Herpetology 67:1–53.

Herrera, F., S. R. Manchester, J. Velez-Juarbe, and C. Jaramillo. 2014. Phytogeographic history of the Humiriaceae (Part 2).  International Journal of Plant Sciences 175:828–840.

Hollick, A. 1928. Paleobotany of Porto Rico. New York Academy of Sciences, Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands 7(3):177–393.

Iturralde-Vinent, M. A., and R. D. E. MacPhee. 1996. Age and paleogeographic origin of Dominican amber. Science 273:1850–1852.

MacPhee, R. D. E., and M. A. Iturralde-Vinent. 1995. Origin of the Greater Antillean land mammal fauna, 1: new Tertiary fossils from Cuba and Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 3141:1–30.

Marivaux, L., J. Velez-Juarbe, G. Merzeraud, F. Pujos, L. W. Viñola Lopez, M. Boivin, H. Santos-Mercado, E. J. Cruz, A. Grajales, J. Padilla, K. I. Velez-Rosado, M. Philippon, J.-L. Léticée, P. Münch, and P.-O. Antoine. 2020. Early Oligocene chinchilloid caviomorphs from Puerto Rico and the initial colonization of the West Indies. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 287:2019806.

Ortega-Ariza, D., E. K. Franseen, H. Santos-Mercado, W. R. Ramírez-Martínez, E. E. Core-Suárez. 2015. Strontium isotope stratigraphy for Oligocene-Miocene carbonate systems in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic: Implications for Caribbean processes affecting depositional history. Journal of Geology 123:539–560.

Poinar, G. O., Jr., and D. C. Cannatella. 1987. An upper Eocene frog from the Dominican Republic and its implication for Caribbean biogeography. Science 237:1215–1216.

Poinar, G., Jr., and D. B. Wake. 2015. Palaeoplethodon hispaniolae gen. n., sp. n. (Amphibia: Caudata), a fossil salamander from the Caribbean. Palaeodiversity 8:21–29.

Presslee, S., G. J. Slater, F. Pujos, A. M. Forasiepi, R. Fischer, K. Molloy, M. Mackie, J. L. Lanata, J. Southon, R. Feranec, J. Bloch, A. Hajduk, F. M. Martin, R. Salas Gismondi, M. Reguero, C. de Muizon, A. Greenwood, B. T. Chait, K. Penkman, M. Collins, and R. D. E. MacPhee. 2019. Paleoproteomics resolve sloth relationships. Nature Ecology and Evolution 3:1121–1130.

Velez-Juarbe, J., and D. P. Domning. 2014. Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region: X. Priscosiren atlantica, gen. et sp. nov. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:951–964.

Velez-Juarbe, J., C. A. Brochu, and H. Santos. 2007. A gharial from the Oligocene of Puerto Rico: transoceanic dispersal in the history of a non-marine reptile. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 274:1245–1254.

Velez-Juarbe, J., T. Martin, R. D. E. MacPhee, and D. Ortega-Ariza. 2014. The earliest Caribbean rodents: Oligocene caviomorphs from Puerto Rico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:157–163.

The Oldest Caribbean frog: an Oligocene Coquí from Puerto Rico!

Greater Caribbean land frogs (aka robber frogs; genus Eleutherodactylus) are the most numerous group of amphibians in the region with over 240 known species. Of these, possibly the most well known species is the common coquí (Eleutherodactylus coqui), considered as a symbol of national pride in Puerto Rico, but a nuisance in other places where they have been introduced, like Hawaii and California. With so many different species spread across the Caribbean it makes one wonder, how long did they arrive to the region? Well, today (April 8, 2020) we published a new discovery that can help answer that question.

Today my colleagues David Blackburn, Rachel Keeffe and Maria Camila Vallejo-Pareja from the Florida Museum of Natural History and I described a fossil that represents the oldest fossil frog from the Caribbean region! In this work, published in the scientific journal Biology Letters, we describe in great detail a small bone that represents the oldest record of a frog belonging to the genus Eleutherodactylus or coquí frog, as they are known in Puerto Rico. The fossil was discovered in a locality in northwestern Puerto Rico, in sediments that were deposited between 31-29 million years ago. This new locality is very close to the one that yielded the oldest Caribbean rodents, which was published last February. Prior to our discovery, the oldest record of a fossil Eleutherodactylus was from the early Miocene of the Dominican Republic (~20-15 Ma), thus our find extends the record of this group by about an additional 10 million years.
Top: map of Puerto Rico showing the distribution of Oligocene-Miocene deposits.
Center: the fossil site (left) and the fossil humerus (right) described in our paper.
Bottom: interpretive illustration of the fossil coqui from Puerto Rico.
The fossil consists of the distal end of a humerus (arm bone) which shows diagnostic characteristics that allowed us to identify it as a frog, and more specifically as a member of the genus Eleutherodactylus. This species-rich group of frogs share common ancestors with other groups of frogs from South America, where there are other species of Eleutherodactylus as well. With few exceptions, this is consistent with a South American origin for the majority of terrestrial vertebrates in the Antilles. One of those rare exceptions is the presence of the salamander Palaeoplethodon hispaniolae a group that is completely absent in the region and whose closest relatives are in North America.

Part of the process to identify our fossil coquí was to compare it with representatives of other Caribbean amphibians. This included: 11 out of the 17 species of coquí known from the Puerto Rico bank, other subgenera of Eleutherodactylus, the Puerto Rican toad (Peltophryne lemur), Hispaniolan green treefrog (Boana heilprini), Cuban treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) and the Antillean white-lipped frog (Leptodactylus albilabris). This way we made sure we had as broad sample as possible.
Comparison of the fossil coquí from Puerto Rico with other species of Eleutherodactylus (top) and other related subgenera (bottom). (Modified from Figure S1 of our work).
Comparison of the fossil coquí from Puerto Rico with representatives of other Eleutherodactylus subgenera and with other Caribbean anurans. (Modified from Figure 2 of our work).
Based on the morphological information from the fossil coquí as well as a number of extant species, we were also able to estimate a body size for this species (see reconstruction in the first image) of about 36 mm (1.4 inches; snout-urostyle length).

Finding the oldest coquí frog sure is exciting, as it represents a unique record that extends the presence of this group to the early Oligocene. Based on this discovery, in combination with some molecular divergence estimates, we can hypothesize that the initial colonization of Eleutherodactylus in the Caribbean likely took place under the same conditions which facilitated the arrival of other terrestrial vertebrates, like sloths and rodents, during the late Eocene-early Oligocene, as discussed in this previous post.
A male common coquí (Eleutherodactylus coqui) guarding its egg clutch.
This discovery is the latest addition to the growing knowledge on the origins of the Greater Antillean terrestrial fauna. Currently, based on fossils from the early Oligocene of Puerto Rico, there were gharials, side-necked turtles, coquí frogs, ground sloths and large caviomorph rodents. However, as always, there is still a lot more work to do, sediments to sort, and fossils to prepare and describe, so stay tuned for more updates, hopefully in the not so distant future.

Recommended Literature

Blackburn, D. C., R. M. Keeffe, M. C. Vallejo-Pareja, and J. Velez-Juarbe. 2020. The earliest record of Caribbean frogs: a fossil coquí from Puerto Rico. Biology Letters 16:20190947.

Delsuc, F., M. Kuch, G. C. Gibb, E. Karpinski, D. Hackenberger, P. Szpak, J. G. Martínez, J. I. Mead, H. G. McDonald, R. D. E. MacPhee, G. Billet, L. Hautier, and H. N. Poinar. 2019. Ancient mitogenomes reveal the evolutionary history and biogeography of sloths. Current Biology 29:2031–2042.

Graham, A., and D. M. Jarzen. 1969. Studies in neotropical botany. I. The Oligocene communities of Puerto Rico. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 56:308–357.

Hedges, S. B. 2006. Paleogeography of the Antilles and origin of the West Indian terrestrial vertebrates. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 93:231–244.

Hedges, S. B., R. Powell, R. W. Henderson, S. Hanson, and J. C. Murphy. 2019. Definition of the Caribbean islands biogeographic region, with checklist and recommendations for standardized common names of amphibians and reptiles. Caribbean Herpetology 67:1–53.

Herrera, F., S. R. Manchester, J. Velez-Juarbe, and C. Jaramillo. 2014. Phytogeographic history of the Humiriaceae (Part 2).  International Journal of Plant Sciences 175:828–840.

Hollick, A. 1928. Paleobotany of Porto Rico. New York Academy of Sciences, Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands 7(3):177–393.

Iturralde-Vinent, M. A., and R. D. E. MacPhee. 1996. Age and paleogeographic origin of Dominican amber. Science 273:1850–1852.

MacPhee, R. D. E., and M. A. Iturralde-Vinent. 1995. Origin of the Greater Antillean land mammal fauna, 1: new Tertiary fossils from Cuba and Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 3141:1–30.

Marivaux, L., J. Velez-Juarbe, G. Merzeraud, F. Pujos, L. W. Viñola Lopez, M. Boivin, H. Santos-Mercado, E. J. Cruz, A. Grajales, J. Padilla, K. I. Velez-Rosado, M. Philippon, J.-L. Léticée, P. Münch, and P.-O. Antoine. 2020. Early Oligocene chinchilloid caviomorphs from Puerto Rico and the initial colonization of the West Indies. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 287:2019806.

Ortega-Ariza, D., E. K. Franseen, H. Santos-Mercado, W. R. Ramírez-Martínez, E. E. Core-Suárez. 2015. Strontium isotope stratigraphy for Oligocene-Miocene carbonate systems in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic: Implications for Caribbean processes affecting depositional history. Journal of Geology 123:539–560.

Poinar, G. O., Jr., and D. C. Cannatella. 1987. An upper Eocene frog from the Dominican Republic and its implication for Caribbean biogeography. Science 237:1215–1216.

Poinar, G., Jr., and D. B. Wake. 2015. Palaeoplethodon hispaniolae gen. n., sp. n. (Amphibia: Caudata), a fossil salamander from the Caribbean. Palaeodiversity 8:21–29.

Presslee, S., G. J. Slater, F. Pujos, A. M. Forasiepi, R. Fischer, K. Molloy, M. Mackie, J. L. Lanata, J. Southon, R. Feranec, J. Bloch, A. Hajduk, F. M. Martin, R. Salas Gismondi, M. Reguero, C. de Muizon, A. Greenwood, B. T. Chait, K. Penkman, M. Collins, and R. D. E. MacPhee. 2019. Paleoproteomics resolve sloth relationships. Nature Ecology and Evolution 3:1121–1130.

Velez-Juarbe, J., and D. P. Domning. 2014. Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region: X. Priscosiren atlantica, gen. et sp. nov. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:951–964.

Velez-Juarbe, J., C. A. Brochu, and H. Santos. 2007. A gharial from the Oligocene of Puerto Rico: transoceanic dispersal in the history of a non-marine reptile. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 274:1245–1254.

Velez-Juarbe, J., T. Martin, R. D. E. MacPhee, and D. Ortega-Ariza. 2014. The earliest Caribbean rodents: Oligocene caviomorphs from Puerto Rico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:157–163.

Monday, March 23, 2020

Los Roedores Endémicos de Puerto Rico

Muchos hemos escuchado que alguna vez en Puerto Rico existieron especies endémicas de roedores los cuales se extinguieron entre cientos a varios miles de años atrás. Este tema surge especialmente cada vez que hay algún avistamiento, usualmente de un agutí (Dasyprocta sp.), en alguna parte de la isla. Aquí discutiré las distintas especies de roedores grandes que hay o han existido en la isla y aclarar la identidad de las especies endémicas de Puerto Rico y porqué no habían jutías endémicas.

¿Qué es una jutía?
El nombre jutía se ha utilizado de manera informal para referirse a distintas especies de roedores caviomorfos caribeños, en parte porque las relaciones taxonómicas entre algunas especies no han estado claras y en parte porque no todas tienen un nombre común y es más fácil llamarles así. Sin embargo, técnicamente, el nombre jutía solamente le aplica a uno de los varios grupo de roedores endémicos de esta región, específicamente a los que forman el grupo taxonómico conocido como Capromyinae (antes Capromyidae). Este grupo generalmente consiste de especies bastante grandes, algunas, como Capromys pilorides de Cuba llegan a pesar más de 7 kg (~15 libras); en este grupo hay especies con hábitos terrestres y otras arbóreas. En comparación con el agutí, las jutías tiene el rabo más largo, incluso, parece ser presil en algunas especies, y los dientes son muy distintos. Actualmente, las jutías de la subfamilia Capromyinae se encuentran en las Islas Bahamas, Jamaica, Cuba y La Española, mientras que están ausentes en Puerto Rico. El registro más antiguo de este grupo de roedores se descubrió en depósitos del Mioceno temprano (~18-17 millones de años) en la localidad de Domo de Zaza en Cuba y es representado por la especie Zazamys veronicae. En adición a Zazamys hay otras especies que se extinguieron entre unos miles a cientos de años atrás en estas islas.
Distribución geográfica de las jutías (ilustración tomada de Fabre et al., 2014:fig. 1).
La jutía de Puerto Rico que no fue
Una de las tantas especies de jutías extintas es el Isolobodon portoricensis Allen, 1916. Esta especie fue descrita hace más de 100 años atrás basada en especímenes colectados de un depósito arqueológico en el municipio de Utuado. A pesar de haber sido "bautizada" como portoricensis esta especie no es endémica de Puerto Rico (no se dejen engañar por los nombres científicos), pero sí lo era de la vecina isla de La Española. Los restos de Isolobodon son comúnmente encontrados en depósitos arqueológicos o depósitos más jóvenes (posterior a la llegada de los primeros pobladores) y eran evidentemente utilizados como alimento. El Isolobodon es claramente uno de los primeros ejemplos de los pobladores de Puerto Rico introduciendo especies exóticas en la isla!
Al presente, Isolobodon se considera como parte de la familia Isolobodontinae, la cual bajo clasificaciones taxonómicas previas era parte de la familia Capromyidae. Sin embargo, estudios recientes (e.g. Fabre et al., 2014, Courcelle et al., 2019) determinaron que Capromyidae forma parte de la familia Echimyidae, e incluso la relación de Isolobodon con otros "Capromyidae" aún está por resolverse. El Isolobodon está extinto tanto en PR como en su lugar de origen.
Aquí se puede observar la diferencia entre un agutí (izquierda superior), un capibara (derecha superior), una jutía (izquierda inferior) y reconstrucción de Elasmodontomys obliquus e ilustraciones de su cráneo y mandíbula (derecha inferior).
El Agutí
Actualmente una de las especies que se pueden observar en ocasiones en algunas partes de Puerto Rico son los agutíes. El agutí es relativamente grande, aunque no tanto como el capibara, e incluye distintas especies que habitan en América Central y del Sur. Su aparición en Puerto Rico es debido a que fueron introducidos a la isla en algún momento durante el siglo pasado. Las características principales que caracterizan al agutí es su cola muy corta, hábitos diurnos, son terrestres y en general se alimentan de frutas.

Los Endémicos
Al momento de escribir esta nota, el número de roedores endémicos de Puerto Rico son entre cinco a siete (hay dudas con las afinidades de algunas de las especies). Dos especies fueron descubiertas recientemente y vivieron en la isla entre 29-27 millones de años, siendo los roedores más antiguos de todo el Caribe! Las otras cuatro especies son más recientes, algunas incluso apenas se extinguieron entre 1200-2400 años atrás. Los roedores endémicos de Puerto Rico que han sido descritos pertenecían a estos dos grupos taxonómicos:

Echimyidae, Heteropsomyinae (dos especies)
Los roedores Heteropsomyinae eran un grupo endémico de las Antillas con especies en Cuba, La Española y Puerto Rico. A este grupo se les ha llamado ratas espinosas, aunque ese nombre sólo le aplica a las especies dentro de un grupo cercano (Echimyinae). Interesantemente, las especies de Puerto Rico eran más grandes que las de las otras islas, posiblemente debido a la ausencia de jutías.
1. Puertoricomys corozalus (Williams and Koopman, 1951): esta es la especie menos común, solamente se conoce de una mandíbula colectada en una cueva en el norte de la isla. Se asume que este fósil puede ser más viejo que los de otras especies de Heteropsomyinae de Puerto Rico por el tipo de preservación. Sin embargo, no hay información más precisa y se estima que existió entre un par de millones de años, hasta hace unos cuantos miles de años atrás.
2. Heteropsomys insulans Anthony, 1916: esta es una especie relativamente común y sus restos se han encontrado en varias localidades en el norte de la isla. Homopsomys antillensis, también de Puerto Rico, se considera en ocasiones como un posible sinónimos junior de Heteropsomys o como una especie separada. Se estima que Heteropsomys insulans llegó a pesar alrededor de 2 kg (~4.4 lb). El registro más jóven de esta especie es de alrededor 1200 años atrás.

Dinomyidae (tres especies)
Este grupo incluye la llamada "jutía" gigante de Puerto Rico (Elasmodontomys obliquus). Esta especie y otras relacionadas han sido usualmente clasificadas dentro de su propia familia taxonómica llamada Heptaxodontidae la cual en adición a Elasmodontomys también incluye Amblyrhiza inundata (Anguila, St. Maarten y St. Barthélemy), Quemisia gravis (La Española), Clidomys osborni (Jamaica), Xaymaca fulvopulvis (Jamaica) y posiblemente Tainotherium valei (Puerto Rico). La relación de los Heptaxodontidae con otros grupos de roedores caviomorfos ha sido tema de discusión por mucho tiempo. Sin embargo, esto está cambiando a medida que se hacen estudios más detallados. Actualmente, Heptaxodontidae se considera como un grupo polifilético, en otras palabras, que no forman un grupo natural y sus miembros son parte de grupos distintos. La característica principal de este grupo son los dientes laminares y que casi todas las especies eran relativamente grandes, con una de ellas, Amblyrhiza, llegando a pesar alrededor de 200 kg (~440 lb!!!). Hoy día sólamente hay una especie de Dinomyidae a la cual se le conoce como pacarana (Dinomys branickii), la cual vive en las zonas boscosas de Colombia hasta Bolivia.
3. Dinomyidae gen. et sp. indet.: esta es una especie poco común, al presente sólo conocemos parte de un diente. Aún así fue suficiente para identificarlo al nivel de familia y distinguirlo de otras especies conocidas. Basándonos en el tamaño del fragmento de diente se puede estimar que esta especie pesaba alrededor de 12 kg (~26 lb). Esta especie se conoce de depósitos del Oligoceno inferior-Oligoceno superior (29-27 millones de años).
4. Borikenomys praecursor Marivaux et al., 2020: entre los roedores antiguos de Puerto Rico esta especie es más común, aunque al igual que la anterior, solamente se han encontrado en una localidad. Basados en el tamaño de los dientes se estima que esta especie llegó a pesar alrededor de 2 kg (~4.4 lb). Esta especie se conoce de depósitos del Oligoceno inferior-Oligoceno superior (29-27 millones de años).
5. Elasmodontomys obliquus Anthony, 1916: el roedor más grande que ha existido en Puerto Rico. Esta especie se estima que llegó a pesar entre 9-17 kg (~19-37 lb)! Su tamaño era parecido al de Dinomys branickii (pacarana)Elasmodontomys vivió al menos hasta hace unos 2400 años atrás.
Fotos de roedores endémicos de Puerto Rico. Cráneo de Heteropsomys insulans en vista dorsal y ventral (izquierda superior); mandíbula de Heteropsomys sp., colectada en una expedición reciente (derecha superior); dientes de Borikenomys praecursor (izquierda inferior); mandíbulas de Elasmodontomys obliquus y su pariente actual, Dinomys branickii (derecha inferior).
Incertae sedis
Casi todas las especies de roedores endémicos extintos de las Antillas han sido descritos basados en dientes, mandíbulas y/o cráneos. Esto facilita la comparación entre las distintas especies. Sin embargo hay excepciones como la siguiente.
6. Tainotherium valei Turvey et al., 2006: esta especie fue descrita basada en un fémur incompleto. El mismo aparenta ser suficientemente distinto como para representar una especie nueva de un tamaño parecido al de Elasmodontomys obliquus. Basados en las características del fémur, se presume que Tainotherium era una especie arbórea. Sin embargo, no se conoce material adicional de esta especie y según algunos expertos podría tratarse de una forma distinta (morfotipo) de Elasmodontomys. En el estudio donde describen esta especie mencionan que basados en la fauna asociada Tainotherium existió hasta poco más de 5000 años atrás.

Lamentablemente todas estas especies de roedores endémicos de Puerto Rico están extintos desde hace más de 1000 años y cualquier avistamiento de alguna especie de roedor grande, es una especie introducida. No olvidemos que lo que conocemos sobre las especies extintas de Puerto Rico es gracias a estudios paleontológicos que se han llevado a cabo desde principios del siglo pasado, pero todavía queda mucho más por aprender. Hay que recordar que los fósiles son un recurso no renovable, su valor es científico (no monetario) y que son parte de nuestro patrimonio. Si encuentras un fósil es mejor dejarlo donde está, especialmente si require ser excavado o parece frágil, y pásale la información a alguien con la preparación adecuada. Y si lo colectas, no olvides consultar con un experto (i.e. paleontólogo o geólogo), puede ser que hayas encontrado algo que nos ayude a entender mejor el Puerto Rico del pasado y los orígenes de las especies que hoy día se encuentran en la isla.

Espero regresar con este tema en un futuro no tan distante, ya que al presente se están preparando trabajos adicionales para tratar de entender mejor las relaciones de las especies que se extinguieron más recientemente (e.g. Heteropsomys, Elasmodontomys) utilizando métodos más modernos. Mientras, también continuamos buscando fósiles en los depósitos más viejos para entender mejor la fauna del Puerto Rico de hace millones de años.


Lecturas Recomendadas

Allen, J. A. 1916. An extinct octodont from the island of Porto Rico, West Indies. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 27:17–22.

Allen, G. M. 1942. Extinct and vanishing mammals of the Western Hemisphere with the marine species of all the oceans. American Committee for International Wild Life Protection, Special Publication 11:1–620.

Anthony, H. E. 1916. Preliminary report on fossil mammals from Porto Rico, with descriptions of a new genus of ground sloth and two new genera of hystricomorph rodents. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 27:193–203.

Courcelle, M., M.-K. Tilak, Y. L. R. Leite, E. J. P. Douzeri, and P.-H. Fabre. 2019. Digging for the spiny rat and hutia phylogeny using a gene capture approach, with the description of new mammal subfamily. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 136:241–253.

Fabre, P.-H., J. T. Vilstrup, M. Raghavan, C. Der Sarkissian, E. Willerslev, E. J. P. Douzery, and L. Orlando. 2014. Rodents of the Caribbean: origin and diversification of hutias unravelled by next-generation museomics. Biology Letters 10:20140266.

Flemming, C. and R. D. E. MacPhee. 1999. Redetermination of holotype of Isolobodon portoricensis (Rodentia, Capromyidae), with notes on recent mammalian extinctions in Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 3278:1–11.

Marivaux, L., J. Velez-Juarbe, G. Merzeraud, F. Pujos, L. W. Viñola López, M. Boivin, H. Santos-Mercado, E. J. Cruz, A. Grajales, J. Padilla, K. I. Vélez-Rosado, M. Philippon, J.-L. Léticeé, P. Münch, and P.-O. Antoine. 2020. Early Oligocene chinchilloid caviomorphs from Puerto Rico and the initial rodent colonization of the West Indies. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 287:20192806.

MacPhee, R. D. E., and M. A. Iturralde-Vinent. 1995. Origin of the Greater Antillean land mammal fauna, 1: new Tertiary fossils from Cuba and Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 3141:1–31.

MacPhee, R. D. E., M. A. Iturralde-Vinent, and E. S. Gaffney. 2003. Domo de Zaza, an early Miocene vertebrate locality in south-central Cuba, with notes on the tectonic evolution of Puerto Rico and the Mona Passage. American Museum Novitates 3394:1–42.

McFarlane, D. A. 1999. Late Quaternary fossil mammals and last occurrence dates from caves at Barahona, Puerto Rico. Caribbean Journal of Science 35:238–248.

Morgan, G. S., and L. Wilkins. 2003. The extinct rodent Clidomys (Heptaxodontidae) from a late Quaternary Deposit in Jamaica. Caribbean Journal of Science 39:34–41.

Turvey, S. T., F. V. Grady, and P. Rye. 2006. A new genus and species of 'giant hutia' (Tainotherium valei) from the Quaternary of Puerto Rico: an extinct arboreal quadruped? Journal of Zoology 270:585–594.

Turvey, S. T., J. R. Oliver, Y. M. Narganes Storde, and P. Rye. 2007. Late Holocene extinction of Puerto Rican native land mammals. Biology Letters 3:193–196.

Upham, N. S. 2017. Past and present of insular Caribbean mammals: understanding Holocene extinctions to inform modern biodiversity conservation. Journal of Mammalogy 98:913–917.

Upham, N. S., and R. Borroto Páez. 2017. Molecular phylogeography of endangered Cuban hutias within the Caribbean radiation of capromyid rodents. Journal of Mammalogy 98:950–963.

Velez-Juarbe, J., T. Martin, R. D. E. MacPhee, and D. Ortega-Ariza. 2014. The earliest Caribbean rodents: Oligocene caviomorphs from Puerto Rico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:157–163.

Williams, E. E., and K. F. Koopman. 1951. A new fossil rodent from Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 1515:1–9.

Woods, C. A. 1996. The land mammals of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 776:131–149.

Woods, C. A., R. Borroto Páez and C. W. Kilpatrick. 2001. Insular patterns and radiations of West Indian rodents. Pp. 335–353 in Biogeography of the West Indies: New Patterns and Perspectives (C. A. Woods and F. E. Sergile, eds.). 2nd ed. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Los roedores más antiguos del Caribe, Parte 2!!

Esta semana ha salido publicado en la revista Proceedings of the Royal Society B un artículo científico donde este servidor, junto con un grupo internacional de paleontólogos y geólogos y colegas del Departamento de Geología de mi querida Alma mater Colegial, describimos los restos de roedores más antiguos del Puerto Rico y el Caribe. Si el tema suena familiar, es porque en una entrada previa (enero 2014) escribí sobre dos roedores, también muy antiguos, que descubrimos en unas localidades en el noroeste de Puerto Rico, estos provenían de unos depósitos de entre 29-27 y 27-24 millones de años, respectivamente. En ese momento nuestro descubrimiento consistía de unos incisores, los cuales no son muy diagnósticos. Aún así, mediante el estudio de la micro estructura del esmalte de esos dientes, logramos determinar que estos pertenecían a roedores caviomorfos posiblemente relacionados a los roedores endémicos que solían vivir en Puerto Rico y que todavía sobreviven en algunas de las Antillas.

Hace aproximadamente un año regresé a excavar a una de esas localidades como parte del proyecto GAARAnti el cual es liderado por mis colegas de la Universidad de Montpellier y financiado por la agencia nacional de investigaciones de Francia, (aquí pueden leer un resumen del proyecto el cual es muy interesante!!). Para nuestra sorpresa, durante esta excavación descubrimos tres dientes adicionales!! Y mejor aún, en esta ocasión los dientes que encontramos fueron molares. Los molares tienen más detalles anatómicos y mayor complejidad (ver imagen abajo). Esto nos permitió hacer una determinación más precisa sobre la identidad de estos roedores que habitaban en Puerto Rico hace 29 millones de años. Fue así que logramos identificar a estas especies extintas de roedores como pertenecientes al grupo denominados como Chinchilloidea o "chinchilloideos", en otras palabras, parientes extintos de las chinchillas, vizcachas y pacaranas, especies que hoy día habitan en América del Sur.
Imágenes de los dientes fósiles que encontramos; a-f, 3er molar inferior derecho de Borikenomys praecursorg-j, molar inferior izquierdo de B. praecursork-n, fragmento de molar inferior izquierdo o superior derecho de una especie indeterminada de roedor chinchilloideo.   

Más allá de la identificación de estos dientes como pertenecientes a chinchilloideos, al estudiar detalladamente la morfología de estos molares, determinamos que representan dos especies distintas relacionadas a las pacaranas (Dinomyidae). El grupo de los Dinomyidae fue en un momento muy diverso, incluyendo la especie de roedor más grande que haya existido, pero hoy día solo está representado por la pacarana (Dinomys branickii).

Una de las especies de Puerto Rico está representada por dos de los molares, lo cual nos permite hacer una identificación más precisa, y al tratarse de un animal previamente desconocido, le pusimos el nombre científico de Borikenomys praecursor! La primera parte del nombre científico es una combinación de Borikén (= Borinquen) nombre por el cual se le conocía a Puerto Rico en tiempos ancestrales, y el sufijo griego mys, que significa ratón. Mientras que la segunda parte se relaciona a que esta especie representa el roedor más antiguo de las Antillas.

La segunda especie que descubrimos consiste de un diente incompleto, suficiente como para saber que se trata de un roedor parecido al Borikenomys, pero más grande. Aun así, necesitaríamos más dientes o dientes más completos, para poder asignarle un nombre científico. Pero más importante aún, nuestros resultados demuestran que estos roedores antiguos están emparentados con la jutía gigante de PR (Elasmodontomys obliquus) y posiblemente a la jutía gigante de Anguila (Amblyrhiza inundata), estas especies gigantes se extinguieron hace unos pocos miles de años atrás, previo o un poco después de la llegada de los primeros pobladores a las Antillas. Aunque Borikenomys no representa una conexión directa con la jutía gigante de PR, si es lo suficientemente cercano como para determinar que este grupo llegó a la isla previo a 29 millones de años atrás.
Filogenia calibrada demosstrando la relación de BorikenomysElasmodontomysAmblyrhiza y otros roedores caviomorfos. Los distintos grupos principales de roedores caviomorfos son: Ocotodontoidea (en violeta; este grupo incluye las ratas espinosas y las jutías que todavía existen en el Caribe), Chinchillodea (en azul; jutías gigantes y chinchillas); Erethizontoidea (en anaranjado; puerco espines); Cavioidea (en rojo; agutíes).

Cómo y cuando llegaron estas ratas y otros vertebrados terrestres a las Antillas
Durante un periodo corto entre 35-33 millones de años existió una posible conexión terrestre entre el norte de América del Sur y las Antillas Mayores. Una combinación de eventos climáticos y procesos tectónicos (los mismos que están causando temblores en PR durante los primeros meses de 2020), hicieron que esta conexión fuera posible. Esta hipótesis, conocida como GAARlandia, propone que esta conexión sirvió como puente entre América del Sur y las Antillas (ver imagen abajo). De esta forma los ancestros de Borikenomys, de los perezosos terrestres antillanos y otros vertebrados terrestres de los cuales les contaré en un futuro no muy lejano, lograron dispersarse desde el continente a las Antillas. Luego de 33 millones de años atrás, ese puente y esas conexiones cercanas entre las Antillas se fueron rompieron, separando las islas pero dando paso a una radiación evolutiva en las distintas islas. Cabe destacar que GAARlandia no necesariamente fue la única manera que llegaron vertebrados terrestres a las Antillas. Algunos grupos, como las jutías que hoy día viven en La Española, Cuba y Jamaica (Capromyidae), aparentan haber llegado a la región por medio de dispersión aleatoria alrededor de 18 millones de años atrás. Otros grupos, también originándose en América del Sur han ido llegado en eventos de dispersión y colonización durante los últimos 15 millones de años.

Reconstrucción paleogeográfica de la región del Caribe entre 35-33 millones de años. Las flechas muestran las direcciones de dispersión de distintos grupos de vertebrados. (Modificado de Iturralde-Vinent y MacPhee, 1999; Velez-Juarbe et al., 2014).



Lecturas Recomendadas

Dávalos, L. M. 2004. Phylogeny and biogeography of Caribbean mammals. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 81:373–394.

Delsuc, F., M. Kuch, G. C. Gibb, E. Karpinski, D. Hackenberger, P. Szpak, J. G. Martínez, J. I. Mead, H. G. McDonald, R. D. E. MacPhee, G. Billet, L. Hautier, and H. N. Poinar. 2019. Ancient mitogenomes reveal the evolutionary history and biogeography of sloths. Current Biology 29:2031–2042. (DOI:10.1016/j.cub.2019.05.043)

Hedges, S. B. 2006. Paleogeography of the Antilles and origin of West Indian terrestrial vertebrates. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 93:231–244.

Hedges, S. B., C. A. Hass, and L. R. Maxson. 1992. Caribbean biogeography: molecular evidence for dispersal in West Indian terrestrial vertebrates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 89:1909–1913.

Herrera, F., S. R. Manchester, J. Velez-Juarbe, and C. Jaramillo. 2014. Phytogeographic history of the Humiriaceae (Part 2). International Journal of Plant Science 175:828–840. (DOI:10.1086/676818)

Iturralde-Vinent, M. A., and R. D. E. MacPhee. 1999. Paleogeography of the Caribbean region: implications for Cenozoic biogeography. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 238:1–95.

MacPhee, R. D. E. 2005. 'First' appearances in the Cenozoic land-mammal record of the Greater Antilles: significance and comparison with South American and Antarctic records. Journal of Biogeography 32:551–564. (DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2699.2004.01231.x)

MacPhee, R. D. E. 2011. Basicranial morphology and relationships of Antillean Heptaxodontidae (Rodentia, Ctenoystrica, Caviomorpha). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 363:1–70.

MacPhee, R. D. E., and M. A. Iturralde-Vinent. 1995. Origin of the Greater Antillean land mammal fauna, 1: new Tertiary fossils from Cuba and Puerto Rico. American Museum Novitates 3141:1–30.

MacPhee, R. D. E., M. A. Iturralde-Vinent, and E. S. Gaffney. 2003. Domo de Zaza, an early Miocene vertebrate locality in south-central Cuba, with notes on the tectonic evolution of Puerto Rico and the Mona Passage. American Museum Novitates 3394:1–42.

Marivaux, L., J. Velez-Juarbe, G. Merzeraud, F. Pujos, L. W. Viñola López, M. Boivin, H. Santos-Mercado, E. J. Cruz, A. Grajales, J. Padilla, K. I. Vélez-Rosado, M. Philippon, J.-L. Léticée, P. Münch, and P.-O. Antoine. 2020. Early Oligocene chinchilloid caviomorphs from Puerto Rico and the initial colonization of the West Indies. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 287:20192806.

Ortega-Ariza, D., E. K. Franseen, H. Santos-Mercado, W. R. Ramirez, and E. E. Core-Suarez. 2015. Strontum isotope stratigraphy for Oligocene-Miocene carbonate systems in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic: implications for Caribbean processes affecting depositional history. Journal of Geology 123:539–560. (DOI:10.1086/683335)

Presslee, S., G. J. Slater, F. Pujos, A. M. Forasiepi, R. Fischer, K. Molloy, M. Mackie, J. V. Olsen, A. G. Kramarz, M. Taglioretti, F. Scaglia, M. Lezcano, J. L. Lanata, J. Southon, R. Feranec, J. Bloch, A. Hajduk, F. M. Martin, R. Salas Gismondi, M. Reguero, C. de Muizon, A. Greenwood, B. T. Chait, K. Penkman, M. Collins, and R. D. E. MacPhee. 2019. Paleoproteomics resolves sloth relationships. Nature Ecology and Evolution 3:1121–1130. (DOI:10.1038/s41559-019-0909-z)

Velez-Juarbe, J., and D. P. Domning. 2014. Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. X. Priscosiren atlantica, gen. et sp. nov. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:951–964. (DOI:10.1080/02724634.2013.815192)

Velez-Juarbe, J., C. A. Brochu, and H. Santos. 2007. A gharial from the Oligocene of Puerto Rico: transoceanic dispersal in the history of a non-marine reptile. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 274:1245–1254. (DOI:10.1098.rspb.2006.0455)

Velez-Juarbe, J., T. Martin, R. D. E. MacPhee, and D. Ortega-Ariza. 2014. The earliest Caribbean rodents: Oligocene caviomorphs from Puerto Rico. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34:157–163. (DOI:10.1080/02724634.2013.789039)

Monday, May 13, 2019

Descubrimiento Inesperado: Focas Monje en el Miocene del Pacífico Norte

El miércoles pasado (8 de mayo de 2019) acaba de ser publicado mi más reciente trabajo en la revista científica Biology Letters! En esta ocasión el trabajo fue realizado en colaboración con mi colega Ana Valenzuela-Toro, candidata doctoral del Departamento de Ecología y Biología Evolutiva de la Universidad de California en Santa Cruz.
Foto de los dientes que describimos y la localidad donde se encontraron. Las siluetas representan el conjunto de mamíferos marinos descubiertos en la localidad. También se observa otras localidades donde se han descubierto focas monje del Mioceno de las Américas y la distribución de las focas monje actuales.
En nuestro artículo describimos un par de dientes, que quizás no parezcan mucho, pero tienen una historia muy interesante que contar. La primera vez que vimos los dientes, ambos inmediatamente los reconocimos como que eran de foca y no de otros pinípedos conocidos de California u otras partes del Pacífico Norte (por ejemplo, morsas y lobos marinos). Luego de comparaciones exhaustivas y estudio, determinamos que los dientes pertenecían específicamente a focas monje (Monachinae). Hoy día las focas monje son un grupo pequeño de focas que incluye, específicamente, la foca monje del mediterráneo (Monachus monachus), foca monje hawaiana (Neomonachus schauinslandi) y la foca monje caribeña (Neomonachus tropicalis). Si nunca habías escuchado de la foca monje caribeña, es porque esta especie, la cual como indica su nombre, vivía en la región del Caribe (incluyendo Puerto Rico) fue declarada extinta (oficialmente) en 2008, aunque ya hacía muchos años que había sido extirpada por los humanos. Sin embargo, las focas monje tienen un registro fósil que se extiende a más de 15 millones de años, y se conocen especies fósiles de la región del mediterráneo, Atlántico Norte, Argentina, Chile y Perú. Pero nunca antes habían sido encontradas en California.
Arriba: otras fotos mostrando los dientes de focas monje de California que describimos en nuestro trabajo.
Abajo: dientes de otras especies de focas monjes actuales y fósiles de las Américas.
Los dientes que describimos provienen de una localidad en el sur de California parte de la Formación Monterey, un depósito marino que se formó entre 14.9-7.1 millones de año atrás (Smith, 1960; Blake, 1991; Barron y Isaacs, 2001). Por medio del estudio de microfósiles colectados en esa localidad, se estima que el horizonte donde se encontraron los fósiles se depositó entre 8.5-7.1 millones de años atrás. Esto nos da una una edad bastante precisa y nos da una mejor idea de cuándo vivieron los fósiles que se encuentran en esa localidad específica.

Los fósiles de esta localidad se colectaron entre 1969 y 1982. Parte de la colecta se llevó a cabo de manera organizada y financiado por la National Geographic Society. Gracias a esto se pudo publicar un reporte inicial detallando cómo se formó el depósito y cómo se encontraron los fósiles (Barnes et al., 1985). Particularmente los fósiles que Ana y yo estudiamos se depositaron en un mismo horizonte, lo que en inglés llamaríamos como bonebed o capa de huesos. En ocasiones pasadas he escrito sobre capas de huesos, como la de Cerro Ballena en Chile y Sharktooth Hill en California. Las capas de huesos no proveen una idea bastante precisa de qué organismos vivían en un área durante un periodo relativamente preciso en la larga historia del planeta tierra. Esto quiere decir que las focas monje al igual que los otros mamíferos marinos que describimos vivían en esta parte del sur de California entre 8.5-7.1 millones de años atrás. Esto es significativo porque nos provee un dato relativamente preciso de como era parte de la fauna marina en ese tiempo, pero también resultó ser un descubrimiento sorprendente ya que nunca antes se habían descubierto fósiles de focas monje en esta parte del mundo! De hecho, hasta ahora el registro fósil de focas en el Pacífico Norte solo se remontaba a unos miles de años atrás, nuestro descubrimiento lo cambió a más de 7 millones de años!!
Mapa mostrando el posible origen del las focas monje californianas.
Este descubrimiento sorprendente nos llevó a comparar distintas faunas a través de las Américas y a formular dos hipótesis para explicar de dónde salieron los ancestros o parientes cercanos de nuestras focas monje californianas. Nuestra comparación nos llevó principalmente a depósitos del Mioceno tardío en Chile y Perú, los cuales Ana y yo conocemos bastante bien. Basándonos en similitudes entre las faunas de mamíferos marinos contemporáneas de Chile y Perú, una de nuestras hipótesis es que el origen de las focas monje californianas se encuentra en la costa del Pacífico de América del Sur. Sin embargo, no debemos olvidar que también se han encontrado focas monje en depósitos del Mioceno en la costa este de Norte América, y que hasta hace unas cuantas décadas había una foca monje en el Caribe. Tampoco debemos olvidar que el Paso Marino Centroamericano estuvo abierto hasta hace 3.5-3 millones de años atrás, uniendo el Mar Caribe con el Océano Pacífico (O'Dea et al., 2016). Esto quiere decir que un pariente extinto de las focas monjes hawaiana y caribeña pudo haber tenido una distribución más amplia y haber llegado hasta California, esto en parte, sería congruente con la hipótesis del origen de estas dos especies, aunque un poco antes de lo estimado (Fulton and Strobeck, 2010; School et al., 2014).

¡Esperemos que en el futuro se pueda descubrir material adicional de estas focas monjes californianas para conocerlas aún mejor!


Referencias

Barnes, L. G., S. A. McLeod, and R. E. Raschke. 1985. A late Miocene marine mammal vertebrate assemblage from Southern California. National Geographic Research Reports 21:13-20.

Barron, J. A., and C. M. Isaacs. 2001. Updated chronostratigraphic framework for the California Miocene. In The Monterey Formation-from rocks to molecules (eds. C. M. Isaacs, J. Rullkötter), pp. 393-395. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Blake, G. H. 1991. Review of the Neogene biostratigraphy and stratigraphy of the Los Angeles Basin and implications for basin evolution. AAPG Memoirs 52:135-184.

O'Dea, A., H. A. Lessios, A. G. coates, R. I. Eytan, S. A. Restrepo-Moreno, A. L. Cione, L. S. Collins, A. de Queiroz, D. W. Farriss, R. D. Norris, R. F. Stallard, M. O. Woodburne, O. Aguilera, M.-P. Aubry, W. A. Berggren, A. F. Budd, M. A. Cozzuol, S. E. Coppard, H. Duque-Caro, S. Finnegan, G. M. Gasparini, E. L. Grossman, K. G. Johnson, L. D. Keigwin, N. Knowlton, E. G. Leigh, J. S. Leonard-Pingel, P. B. Marko, N. D. Pyenson, P. G. Rachello-Dolmen, E. Soibelzon, L. Soibelson, J. A. Todd, G. J. Vermeig, and J. B. C. Jackson. 2016. Formation of the Isthmus of Panama. Science Advances 2016; 2:e1600883.

Fulton, T. L., and C. Strobeck. 2010. Multiple fossil calibrations, nuclear loci and mitochondrial genomes provide new insight into biogeography and divergence timing for true seals (Phocidae, Pinnipedia. Journal of Biogeography 37:814-829.

Scheel, D.-M., G. J. Slater, S.-O. Kolokotronis, C. W. Potter, D. S. Rotstein, K. Tsangaras, A. D. Greenwood, and K. M. Helgen. 2014. Biogeography and taxonomy of extinct and endangered monk seals illuminated by ancient DNA and skull morphology. Zookeys 409:1-33.

Smith, P. B. 1960. Foraminifera of the Monterey Shale and Puente Formation, Santa Ana Mountains and San Juan Capistrano Area, California. USGS Professional Papers 294:463-495.

Velez-Juarbe, J., and A. M. Valenzuela-Toro. 2019. Oldest record of monk seals from the North Pacific and biogeographic implications. Biology Letters 15:20190108.

Friday, October 19, 2018

New publications on middle Miocene walruses of southern California and Baja California Sur

One of the first things I did when I started working at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (MNHLA) was getting familiarized with the collection of fossil marine mammals. Coming in I knew it was (and is) one of the best in the World, but I was still surprised with the extent and amount of fossil pinnipeds. Pinnipeds is the name given to the group that include walruses (Odobenidae), sea lions/fur seals (Otariidae), seals (Phocidae) and a few other related, but extinct groups (e.g. desmatophocids). My first thought was that I would eventually get around to work on pinnipeds after several years, thinking I would first focus more on the cetaceans and herbivorous marine mammals. But then the more I looked at pinnipeds, the more interested I became in their fossil record and what new information we could learn about their evolutionary history based on the specimens at NHMLA and other nearby collections. And so, my interest in this group grew and I found myself working on pinnipeds much sooner than I had originally planned. My first scientific publication on the subject was last year when I described the pan-otariid Eotaria citrica, based on a well-preserved mandible and lower dentition which was published in the open access journal PeerJ (you can download the paper here (Velez-Juarbe, 2017) and also read my post about it).
On the left, the type mandible of Eotaria citrica; on the right, a life reconstruction of how it might have looked like.

The dwarf walrus from Baja California Sur
More recently, my colleague Fernando Salinas-Márquez and I described a new species of walrus that we dubbed Nanodobenus arandai, aka Smallrus or Aranda's dwarf walrus if, you know, you're not into the whole brevity thing.
Myself, holding the type (name-bearing specimen) of Nanodobenus arandai; on the right, the skull of the living walrus, Odobenus rosmarus.
Nanodobenus comes from a very interesting locality in the Vizcaíno Península in Baja California Sur. It was collected from sediments that are part of the Tortugas Formation as exposed along Arroyo La Chiva (also known as Arroyo Tiburón) (Throughton, 1974; Applegate et al., 1979; Moreno-Ruiz and Carreño, 1994). The age range of this formation is somewhat uncertain, or more precisely, broader than I would prefer it to be, as it has been described as ranging from the middle to the late Miocene (Barnes, 1998). For this work, Fernando and I reviewed the scientific literature and were able to restrict its range to 15.7-9.2 Ma, which is admittedly still fairly broad, but we'll hopefully be able to get more precise dates in the not so distant future.  
A more detailed view of the holotype mandible of Nanodobenus arandai, in lateral (top), medial (middle) and occlusal (bottom), views. Modified from Velez-Juarbe and Salinas-Márquez (2018:fig. 2).
 One of the most striking features of Nanodobenus was its small body length, which, based on measurements of the toothrow, was estimated to be around 1.65 m. This places it as the smallest odobenid known so far (see body size outlines below), with a body length more similar to that of the early otariid Pithanotaria starri and around the range of the living fur seal Callorhinus ursinus (Velez-Juarbe, 2017). The small body length of Nanodobenus seems to break a pattern in odobenid evolution, where body size increase seemed to be the norm throughout the mid-late Miocene, culminating in the gigantic walrus Pontolis magnus (Velez-Juarbe, 2017; Boessenecker and Churchill, 2018). The absence of Nanodobenus from contemporaneous units farther north in California could have been due to a number of reasons, like habitat preference, local endemism, or simply that they were there, but we still haven't identified its remains in these other units. Interestingly, dwarfism in odobenids seems to parallel a pattern observed in the South Pacific and the North Sea and Paratethys, where dwarf seals were sympatric with larger species.
Relationships and body sizes of odobenids. Modified from Velez-Juarbe and Salinas-Márquez (2018:fig. 4).
Our paper describing Nanodobenus was published in the open access journal Royal Society Open Science, which means you can download it for free (Velez-Juarbe and Salinas-Márquez, 2018).

Pinnipeds of Sharktooth Hill
Just out today (10/19/2018) is my most recent publication. In it I describe in detail the lower jaw and dentition of the early odobenid Neotherium mirum - originally named by none other than Remington Kellogg in 1931 - in it, I also describe some other significant pinniped mandibles from the Sharktooth Hill Bonebed (STH). I've written about Sharktooth Hill before and I have to say it is one of the most amazing middle Miocene marine deposits in the World! This bone
bed was deposited between 15.9-15.2 million years ago near Bakersfield, CA, and is one of the densest accumulations of marine vertebrates that we know of, with a fairly large number of taxa described so far (e.g. Kellogg, 1931; Howard, 1966; Mitchell, 1966; Barnes, 1988; Lynch and Parham, 2003; Pyenson et al., 2009; Velez-Juarbe, 2018).
Pinniped remains abound in the Sharktooth Hill bonebed, with the second most common one being Neotherium mirum; however, relatively little is known of this species. The original description by Kellogg (1931) was based on postcranial elements, and since then a few papers have discussed and/or described some of its cranial and mandibular features (Mitchell and Tedford, 1973; Repenning and Tedford, 1977; Barnes, 1988; Deméré, 1994; Kohno et al., 1995). In my new publication I described the morphology of the mandible and lower teeth in detail, based on several specimens from the collections at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP). One other aspect I set out to explore was wether Neotherium showed body size sexual dimorphism as previous authors had suggested (Repenning and Tedford, 1977; Barnes, 1988). The morphology of the lower jaw of Neotherium shows an interesting mix of characters, some which are shared with early pinnipedimorphs and others which it shares with more derived odobenids. Size difference amongst the several mandibles I studied support the hypothesis that the species is sexually dimorphic, with male mandibles being around 25% larger than the female mandibles. This was similar to the differences amongst male/female mandibles of Steller's sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus), but less extreme than those shown between males/females of California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).
Various mandible of Neotherium mirum, representing male (A-D, F, and H), and female (E, G, and I) individuals. Modified from Velez-Juarbe (2018:fig. 1).
Neotherium mirum is not the only pinniped known from the Sharktooth Hill Bonebed; two other walruses and two desmatophocids are also known from this unit. One of the other walruses is Pelagiarctos thomasi, which was a relatively large odobenid with fused mandibles and bulbous teeth; its morphology is still poorly known as only a few specimens are known, making it one of the rarest pinnipeds from this unit (Barnes, 1988; Boessenecker and Churchill, 2013). The second walrus is even rarer and was one of the other subjects of my paper. While browsing the collections I came across a mandible that did not look like any of the other STH pinnipeds, so I decided it would be an interesting addition and worthy of describing even if I couldn't pinpoint its precise id because of its incompleteness. This other mandible which I identified as belonging to some unknown odobenid was intermediate in size between male Neotherium mirum and Pelagiarctos thomasi, and showed some interesting characters regarding reduction of the postcanine dentition. Specifically, this unknown odobenid showed a bilobed first molar (m1) while still having double-rooted second through fourth premolars (p2-4). This pattern of root reduction departs form the usual pattern observed amongst odobenids where root simplification usually begins with the more anterior premolars and moves backwards towards the molars.
Phylogenetic analysis showing relationships amongst odobenids and other pinnipeds, highlighting reduction of the postcanine teeth across the different groups. Modified from Velez-Juarbe (2018:fig. 5).
Reduction and simplification of the postcanine dentition is a phenomenon observed across different pinniped groups (Repenning and Tedford, 1977; Barnes, 1989; Deméré, 1994; Barnes et al., 2006; Boessenecker, 2011). Based on the analysis in my paper it seems that simplification/reduction of the postcanine roots in odobenids has occurred several times throughout their evolutionary history (see phylogenetic tree above).
The other pinnipeds from STH are the desmatophocids Allodesmus kernensis and A. cf. A. sadoensis (or A. cf. A. sinanoensis according to Tonomori et al., 2018). The precise number of valid species of Allodesmus from STH has been a issue discussed in the literature for quite some time, with up to three species considered valid: Allodesmus kernensis, A. kelloggi, and A. gracilis (Kellogg, 1922; Mitchell, 1966; Barnes and Hirota, 1995). Fortunately this was resolved recently by Boessenecker and Churchill (2018) who determined that A. kelloggi and A. gracilis are junior synonyms of A. kernensis. In their study they also determined that the morphology of a fragmentary mandible that had been referred by Barnes (1972) as 'Desmatophocine B' was more consistent with Allodesmus sadoensis and referred to it as A. cf. A. sadoensis. The presence of this species in California, otherwise known from middle Miocene deposits in Japan, was further confirmed in my study, where I described and assigned a second mandible to that particular taxon. However, the mandible I assigned to this species was quite rare, with only four postcanine teeth, instead of the more normal five or six; did this represents a more extreme case of tooth reduction or a pathology? We can't tell for now, but hopefully additional specimens will turn up in other collections which will help clarify this. So at present there are up to five species of pinnipeds that were likely sympatric during the deposition of the Sharktooth Hill Bonebed, making it a fairly diverse pinniped assemblage, and unlike anything we see today, especially since there's only one living species of walrus.
Mandibles representing pinnipeds from the Sharktooth Hill Bonebed. Modified from Velez-Juarbe (2018:fig. 6).
This paper on Neotherium and other STH pinnipeds is out on Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, if you are interested in a PDF feel free to email me and I'll send it your way!

The Titan walrus of Orange County
Out this month too was the publication another work with colleagues Isaac Magallanes, Jim Parham and Gabe Santos. In this work (Magallanes et al., 2018) we described a fossil odobenid which we dubbed Titanotaria orangensis from the late Miocene of Orange County, California. In addition to describing this interesting new species, we took a closer look at the fossil record of odobenids as well as revised the taxonomy of the group. I was honored to have been invited to participate in this project and I will be discussing it in more detail in a future post. Meanwhile, you can download the PDF and start reading it as it is open access. 

Even more marine mammal news coming soon, so stay tuned!!!!

References

Applegate, S. P., I. Ferrusquía-Villafranca, and L. Espinoza-Arrubaena. 1979. Preliminary observations on the geology and paleontology of the Arroyo Tiburón area, Bahía de Asunción, Baja California Sur, Mexico; pp. 113-115 in P. L. Abbott, and R. G. Gastil (eds.), Baja California Geology. Field Guides and Papers, Geological Society of America Annual Meeting. San Diego State University Publication, San Diego, CA.

Barnes, L. G. 1972. Miocene Desmatophocinae (Mammalia: Carnivora) from California. University of California Publications in Geological Sciences 89:1-76.

Barnes, L. G. 1988. A new fossil pinniped (Mammalia: Otariidae) from the middle Miocene Sharktooth Hill Bonebed, California. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Contributions in Science 396:1-11.

Barnes, L. G. 1989. A new enaliarctine pinniped from the Astoria Formation, Oregon, and a classification of the Otariidae (Mammalia: Carnivora). Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Contributions in Science 403:1-26.

Barnes, L. G. 1998. The sequence of fossil marine mammal assemblages in Mexico; pp. 26-79 in O. Carranza-Castañeda and D. A. Córdoba-Méndez (eds.), Avances en Investigación, Paleontología de Vertebrados. Publicación Especial 1, Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Mexico.

Barnes, L. G., and K. Hirota. 1995. Miocene pinnipeds of the otariid subfamily Allodesminae in the North Pacific Ocean: systematics and relationships. Island Arc 3:329-360.

Barnes, L. G., C. E. Ray, and I. A. Koretsky. 2006. A new Pliocene sea lion, Proterozetes ulysses from Oregon, U.S.A.; pp. 57-77 in Z. Csiki (ed.), Mesozoic and Cenozoic Vertebrates and Paleoenvironments: Tributes to the Career of Prof. Dan Grigorescu. Bucharest, Romania.

Boessenecker, R. W. 2011. New records of the fur seal Callorhinus (Carnivora: Otariidae) from the Plio-Pleistocene Rio Dell Formation of Northern California and comments on otariid dental evolution. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31:454-467.

Boessenecker, R. W., and M. Churchill. 2013. A reevaluation of the morphology, paleoecology, and phylogenetic relationships of the enigmatic walrus Pelagiarctos. PLoS ONE 8:e54311.

Boessenecker, R. W., and M. Churchill. 2018. The last of the desmatophocid seals: a new species of Allodesmus from the upper Miocene of Washington, USA, and a revision of the taxonomy of Desmatophocidae. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 184:211-235.

Deméré, T. 1994. The family Odobenidae: a phylogenetic analysis of fossil and living taxa. Proceedings of the San Diego Society of Natural History 29:99-123.

Howard, H. 1966. Additional avian records from the Miocene of Sharktooth Hill, California. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Contributions in Science 114:1-11.

Kellogg, R. 1922. Pinnipeds from Miocene and Pleistocene deposits of California. University of California Publications in Geological Sciences 13:23-132.

Kellogg, R. 1931. Pelagic mammals from the Temblor Formation of the Kern River region, California. Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences 19:217-397.

Lynch, S. C., and J. F. Parham. 2003. The first report of hard-shelled sea turtles (Cheloniidae sensu lato) from the Miocene of California, including a new species (Euclastes hutchisoni) with unusually plesiomorphic characters. PaleoBios 23:21-35.

Magallanes, I., J. F. Parham, G.-P. Santos, and J. Velez-Juarbe. 2018. A new tuskless walrus from the Miocene of Orange County, California, with comments on the diversity and taxonomy of odobenids. PeerJ 6:e5708.

Mitchell, E. D. 1966. The Miocene pinniped Allodesmus. University of California Publications in Geological Sciences 61:1-46.

Moreno-Ruiz, J. L., and A. L. Carreño. 1994. Diatom biostratigraphy of Bahía Asunción, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas 11:243-252.

Pyenson, N. D., R. B. Irmis, L. G. Barnes, E. D. Mitchell, S. A. McLeod, and J. H. Lipps. 2009. Origin of a widespread marine bonebed deposited during the middle Miocene Climatic Optimum. Geology 37:519-522.

Repenning, C. A., and R. H. Tedford. 1977. Otarioid seals of the Neogene. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 992:1-87.

Tonomori, W., H. Sawamura, T. Sato, and N. Kohno. 2018. A new Miocene pinniped Allodesmus (Mammalia: Carnivora) from Hokkaido, northern Japan. Royal Society Open Science 5:172440.

Throughton, G. H. 1974. Stratigraphy of the Vizcaíno Peninsula near Asunción Bay, Territorio de Baja California Sur, Mexico. MSc thesis, San Diego State University, 83 pp.

Velez-Juarbe, J. 2017. Eotaria citrica, sp. nov., a new stem otariid from the 'Topanga' Formation of southern California. PeerJ 5:e3022. doi:10.7717/peerj.3022

Velez-Juarbe, J. 2018. New data on the early odobenid Neotherium mirum Kellogg, 1931, and other pinniped remains from the Sharktooth Hill Bonebed, California. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology doi:10.1080/02724634.2018.1481080

Velez-Juarbe, J., and F. M. Salinas-Márquez. 2018. A dwarf walrus from the Miocene of Baja California Sur, Mexico. Royal Society Open Science 5:180423.